Medical and Health Genomics

Medical and Health Genomics provides concise and evidence-based technical and practical information on the applied and translational aspects of genome sciences and the technologies related to non-clinical medicine and public health. Coverage is based on evolving paradigms of genomic medicine―in particular, the relation to public and population health genomics now being rapidly incorporated in health management and administration, with further implications for clinical population and disease management.

  • Provides extensive coverage of the emergent field of health genomics and its huge relevance to healthcare management
  • Presents user-friendly language accompanied by explanatory diagrams, figures, and many references for further study
  • Covers the applied, but non-clinical, sciences across disease discovery, genetic analysis, genetic screening, and prevention and management
  • Details the impact of clinical genomics across a diverse array of public and community health issues, and within a variety of global healthcare systems

Genomics and Society

Genomics and Society; Ethical, Legal-Cultural, and Socioeconomic Implications is the first book to address the vast and thorny web of ELSI topics identified as core priorities of the NHGRI in 2011.

The work addresses fundamental issues of biosociety and bioeconomy as the revolution in biology moves from research lab to healthcare system.

Of particular interest to healthcare practitioners, bioethicists, and health economists, and of tangential interest to the gamut of applied social scientists investigating the societal impact of new medical paradigms, the work describes a myriad of issues around consent, confidentiality, rights, patenting, regulation, and legality in the new era of genomic medicine.

Genomic Medicine Principles and Practice

The first edition of Genomics and Clinical Medicine provided an overview of genomics-based advances in disease susceptibility, diagnosis, and prediction of treatment outcomes in various areas of medicine. Since its publication, the science of genomics has made tremendous progress, and exciting new developments in biotechnology and bioinformatics have created possibilities that were inconceivable only a few years ago. This completely revised second edition of Genomic Medicine reflects the rapidly changing face of applied and translational genomics in the medical and health context and provides a comprehensive coverage of principles of genetics and genomics relevant to the practice of medicine.

The Molecular Biology of Chronic Heart Failure

The clinical syndrome of chronic heart failure (CHF) is the hallmark of progressive cardiac decompensation, one of the most common chronic medical conditions that affect around 2% of the adult population worldwide irrespective of ethnic and geographic origin (Anonymous). Apart from ischemic heart disease, hypertension, infection, and inflammation, several other etiologic factors account for irreparable and irreversible myocardial damage leading to heart failure (HF). Genetic and genomic factors are now increasingly identified as one of the leading underlying factors (Arab and Liu 2005). These factors may be related to pathogenic alterations (mutation or polymorphism) within specific cardiac genes, mutations in genes incorporating single or multiple molecular pathways (protein families) relevant to cardiac structure and/or function, genetic or genomic polymorphisms of uncertain significance (gene variants, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and copy number variations (CNVs)), and epigenetic or epigenomic changes that influence cardiac gene functions scattered across the human genome. Recent genetic and genomic studies in both systolic and diastolic ventricular dysfunction, the hallmark of CHF, have revealed a number of mutations in genes belonging to specific cardiac protein families. For example, around 200 mutations are now known to exist in around 15 genes coding for several different types of sarcomere proteins (Liew and Dzau 2004). The sarcomere protein family, alone, accounts for the bulk of inherited cardiomyopathies including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM), and left ventricular (LV) non-compaction (LVNC). In addition, there are several other potentially relevant factors involving different genes and genome-level elements. This article presents a systematic account on the available factual information and interpretations based on genetic and genomic studies in CHF (Liew and Dzau 2004). Genomic and molecular approaches have opened the way for a renewed debate for taxonomy of CHF (Ashrafian and Watkins 2007). The review draws attention to the potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications of genomic and transcriptional profiling in HF and translational genomics research that is likely to permit greater personalization of prevention and treatment strategies to address

Genomics and Health in the Developing World

Genomics and Health in the Developing World provides detailed and comprehensive coverage of population structures, human genomics, and genome variation – with particular emphasis on medical and health issues – in the emerging economies and countries of the developing world. With sections dedicated to fundamentals of genetics and genomics, epidemiology of human disease, biomarkers, comparative genomics, developments in translational genomic medicine, current and future health strategies related to genetic disease, and pertinent legislative and social factors, this volume highlights the importance of utilizing genetics/genomics knowledge to promote and achieve optimal health in the developing world. Grouped by geographic region, the chapters in this volume address:

  • Inherited disorders in the developing world, including a thorough look at genetic disorders in minority groups of every continent
  • The progress of diagnostic laboratory genetic testing, prenatal screening, and genetic counseling worldwide
  • Rising ethical and legal concerns of medical genetics in the developing world
  • Social, cultural, and religious issues related to genetic diseases across continents

Both timely and vastly informative, this book is a unique and comprehensive resource for genetists, clinicians, and public health professionals interested in the social, ethical, economic, and legal matters associated with medical genetics

Oxford Specialist Handbook: Inherited Cardiac Disease

Many heart conditions are inherited and if not diagnosed and managed appropriately place the patient at risk of blackouts, weakening of the heart, or sudden death.While individually uncommon, inherited diseases of the cardiovascular system collectively represent a major health burden. Current recommendations suggest that individuals and families affected by inherited cardiovascular diseases should have access to specialist care in the form of multidisciplinary teams, with particular knowledge and experience in the diagnosis and management of these conditions. As a result, multidisciplinary services for inherited cardiovascular diseases, involving cardiologists, clinical geneticists, specialist nurses and genetic counsellors, are being developed throughout Europe.

Inherited Cardiac Disease provides healthcare specialists involved in the diagnosis and treatment of inherited cardiovascular disorders with a clinically relevant summary of genetic diseases and readily accessible information that can be used in everyday practice. Containing summaries of most common inherited cardiovascular disorders and describing cardiomyopathies, inherited arrhythmia syndromes, and other inherited cardiovascular syndromes with a focus on aetiology, presentation and management, it also provides the non-specialist with a detailed knowledge of inherited cardiovascular diseases, from the fundamentals of molecular biology and genetic testing to the detailed clinical information relevant to patient management.

Principles and Practice of Clinical Cardiovascular Genetics

Consisting of contributions from experts in all specialties of cardiovascular genetics and applied clinical cardiology, Principles and Practice of Clinical Cardiovascular Genetics serves as the comprehensive volume for any clinician or resident in cardiology and genetics. Each chapter provides a detailed and comprehensive account on the molecular genetics and clinical practice related to specific disorders or groups of disorders, including Marfan syndrome, thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms, hypertrophic, dilated and restrictive cardiomyopathies and Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, as well as many others. All sections comprehensively address cardiovasuclar genetic disorders, beginning with an introduction and including separate sections on the disease’s basic biological aspects, specific genetic mechanisms or issues, clinical aspects, genetic management (e.g., genetic diagnosis, risk assessment, genetic counseling, genetic testing), and clinical management issues. The final section exclusively addresses the management of cardiovascular genetic disorders, specifically considering stem cell therapy, genetic counseling, pharmacogenomics and the social and ethical issues surrounding disease treatment.

Genomics and Clinical Medicine

An important milestone in medicine has been the recent completion of the Human Genome Project. The identification of 30,000 genes and their regulatory proteins provides the framework for understanding the metabolic basis of disease. This advance has also laid the foundation for a broad range of genomic tools that have opened the way for targeted genetic testing in a number of medical disorders. This book is designed to be the first major text to discuss genomics-based advances in disease susceptibility, diagnosis, prognostication, and prediction of treatment outcomes in various areas of medicine. After building a strong underpinning in the basic concepts of genomics, the authors of this book, all leaders in the field, proceed to discuss a wide range of clinical areas and the applications now afforded by genomic analysis.

Genetic Disorders of the Indian Subcontinent

The Indian subcontinent is a vast land mass inhabited by over one billion people. Its rich and varied history is reflected by its numerous racial and ethnic groups and its distinct religious, cultural and social characteristics. Like many developing countries in Asia, it is passing through both demographic and epidemiological transitions whereby, at least in some parts, the diseases of severe poverty are being replaced by those of Westemisation; obesity, diabetes, and heart disease, for example. Indeed, as we move into the new millennium India has become a land of opposites; on the one hand there is still extensive poverty yet, on the other hand, some of the most remarkable developments in commerce and technology in Asia are taking place, notably in the fields of information technology and biotechnology. India has always fascinated human geneticists and a considerable amount of work has been done towards tracing the origins of its different ethnic groups. In the current excitement generated by the human genome project and the molecular and genetic approach to the study of human disease, there is little doubt that this field will develop and flourish in India in the future. Although so far there are limited data about genetic diseases in India, enough is known already to suggest that this will be an extremely fruitful area of